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Terrace Creek Side Trail


Short Hills Provincial Park

From the parking lot, follow the white-blazed main Trail to the left (east). The Trail crosses a roadway Road and proceeds down a slope to cross the road to Wetaskiwin Scout Camp. Continuing along the Hogg Back road allowance the Trail passes through a wet, low-lying area to meet the Terrace Creek Side trail.

Turning right to follow the blue-blazed side trail, you will head south through field and forest to Wiley Road, where there is another parking area and toilets near by. Following the old road, the Trail soon turns right to follow the bank of Terrace Creek and Terrace Falls. After crossing a ford in the creek, the Trail reaches a laneway, which it follows north to end at the main Trail and the parking lot where you began your hike.



The landscape in the Short Hills area is unique to the Niagara region. Over one million years ago a river system flowed north out of present day Lake Erie into what is now Lake Ontario, similar to the present day Niagara River. As water flowed over the Escarpment, a gorge was created which recessed southward. Roughly 12,700 years ago the area of Short Hills was flooded by the body of water known as Lake Warren. Glacial deposits filled the lake, burying the pre-existing gorge to 150 metres above sea level.

The lake water then retreated, leaving a series of rivers such as Twelve Mile Creek, which sliced through the glacial deposits, forming a jumble of small but steep hills and valleys, the "Short Hills." If you are still feeling energetic after completing the Terrace Creek Side Trail, take time to explore the many other trails within Short Hills Provincial Park.



With file information from the Bruce Trail, for more information on this and other Bruce trails please purchase the Bruce Trail map and trail guidebook. The Bruce Trail is the oldest and longest marked hiking trail in Canada. It is 840 km long, with over 440 km of side trails. Every year more than 400,000 visits are made to the Trail as people walk, snowshoe, watch wildlife, take photographs and admire the glorious scenery of the Escarpment.



The Bruce Trail was instrumental in the Escarpment being named a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve by the United Nations in 1990 - one of only twelve such reserves in all of Canada. The Bruce Trail is a member of the Ontario Trails Council through affiliation with Hike Ontario.


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Have you traveled this trail?

If you have any corrections or new information you'd like to send us, we'd love your input. Also, any photos or videos you may have taken of your adventures on this or any other trail are welcome as well. Be a part of our trail community!

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